Sedating antihistamines for anxiety

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According to the American Academy of Family Physicians, benzodiazepines lose their therapeutic anti-anxiety effect after 4 to 6 months of regular use.And a recent analysis reported in found that the effectiveness of SSRIs in treating anxiety has been overestimated, and in some cases is no better than placebo.Sedatives encompass a wide variety of drugs with different mechanisms of action that can induce depression of the central nervous system (CNS).In the first part of the 20th century, the pharmacotherapy of anxiety and insomnia relied on barbiturates, which were replaced with benzodiazepines as drugs of choice in the second part of the previous century.What’s more, it can be very difficult to get off anxiety medications without difficult withdrawals, including rebound anxiety that can be worse than your original problem. Even when anxiety relief comes with side effects and dangers, that can still sound like a fair trade when panic and fear are ruling your life.The bottom line is that there’s a time and place for anxiety medication.When you’re overwhelmed by heart-pounding panic, paralyzed by fear, or exhausted from yet another sleepless night spent worrying, you’ll do just about anything to get relief.And there’s no question that when anxiety is disabling, medication may help. Is there solid evidence that they’re beneficial in the long run?

Barbiturates are nonselective CNS depressants that used to be the mainstay of treatment to sedate patients or to induce and maintain sleep.In modern medicine they have been largely replaced by the benzodiazepines, primarily because they can induce tolerance, physical dependence and serious withdrawal symptoms.Nevertheless, certain barbiturates are still employed as anticonvulsants (phenobarbital) and to induce anesthesia (thiopental).The advantage of psychotherapy over medications is that the benefits tend to persist beyond the end of treatment.The reason for this is easy to see; recovery achieved in therapy occurs via learning, and when you have learned that something isn't dangerous you don't fear it anymore.

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